A Day in the Life of a Shule Kid

Shule Foundation, Jackie Wolfson, street kids, Uganda, Kisenyi, education, drop in center, rehabilitation. soccer, day in the life of a shule kid, teamwork

A Day in the Life of a Shule Kid

A day in the life of a Shule kid might look like all fun and games, but it is not. Our kids are responsible for completing their daily chores and homework, as well as participating in group sessions where they talk about everything and anything. It is during these session the children are able to speak freely and express themselves. We believe allowing our kids to speak openly, have access to a wide range of activities, participate in skill-building workshops, and make visits home before permanently returning there, are key to keeping our kids off the streets.

Learning (English and math)

As many of our children are between the ages of 11 and 16, and will not be returning to formal education — rather pursuing technical or vocational careers — we designed their learning around English and math. The majority of our kids are interested in careers in which improved English and math skills will enable them to be reach a level of success.

Boxing

Boxing has offered our kids several benefits, including self-discipline and determination. It has helped to enhance their physical health, build their confidence, learn to to control their anger and aggression, along with improving their focus both in the ring and in the classroom. Boxing has truly had a positive impact on our kids.

Yoga

Yoga is the one activity that every kid in the house seems to enjoy, and has helped to improve both their physical and mental health. This activity has facilitated the development of their balance, strength, endurance and aerobic capacity. Yoga has also played an important role in enhancing their focus, memory, self-esteem, academic performance, and classroom behavior, while simultaneously reducing anxiety and stress. 

Soccer, aka Futbal 

Soccer has offered our kids an incredible pathway to learning life skills, helping to build their confidence on and off the field. This activity has taught them how to accept both success and disappointment. Soccer has brought the kids together and showed them the important relationship between hard work, teamwork and fun.

Board Games  

We have found that board games don't need to be overtly academic to be educational. Games such as Scrabble, Chess and Monopoly have taught our kids important social skills, such as communicating verbally, sharing, waiting and taking turns. These types of games have helped to foster focus, and lengthen our kids' attention span. Board games have played a key role in bringing all the kids together at the end of each day.

Skill Building

Not all of our children will return to formal education. So we are helping to equip those who have aged out with vocational skills that will enable them to start their own business. We offer liquid soap making and tailoring, but are working to expand to leather bags, shoes and sandals, bake goods, computer training, mechanics, and farming. We want our children to become job creators rather than job seekers. 

join us in maintaining our programs?

Donate